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was the closest of all the american presidents. the reagans had first met prince charles was in california while serving with the real navy in the early 1970s. they had an equally strong relationship with the queen and prince philip, as well as her sister, princess margaret, the queen mother, and her cousin, princess alexandra. they kept an extensive personal correspondence that i was given permission to read at the presidential library out in california, the reagan library. the letters tell a story of infection and thoughtfulness on both sides, over more than three decades. correspondence that continues to this day with nancy reagan. in june of 1982, when the reagans were in europe for summit meetings, the queen invited them to stay at windsor castle. which was the first such personal invitation for an american presidential couple. not only did she arrange such a dedicated telephone line, but she had the first shower installed in the more than 900-year-old castle, because she was told that is what the family needed. it was a family dinner on the first night, and the following morning from the q
. the reagans had first met prince charles when he was in california while serving with the royal navy in the early 1970s and they had an equally fond relationship with the queen and prince philip as well as princess margaret, the queen mother and her cousin, princess alexandra. they kept an expensive personal correspondence the by was given permission to read at the presidential library in california, the reagan library, and the letters tell a story of a fall of fullness on both sides over more than three decades. a correspondence that continues to this day with nancy reagan. in june of 1982 when the reagans were in europe for a summit meeting as the queen invited them to stay at windsor castle which was the first personal invitation for an american presidential couple. not only did she arranged for a dedicated telephone line, at she had the first shower installed in the more than 900-year-old castle because she was told that is what the president needed. there was a family dinner on the first site and the following morning the queen invited to reagans to breakfast. it was surprisingl
to be worse than the private markets. in contrast in a speech in california in may, and it romney's said "the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green products and jobs that yet to we cannot define what a green job it is. that has five definitions of the green job as a discounted. energy from renewable sources. energy efficiency. energy pollution reduction in removal. natural resource conservation. environmental compliance education and training and public awareness. when i was testifying on capitol hill, they had a paper cup in front of me. most the time
is the great plains. west of the rocky mountains to california. it didn't include california because california was already a state. the question was critical because it had to do with the future of slavery and the future of southern power in the nation. now, they have demanded what they consider their constitutional right as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857, there was an infamous decision and the united states supreme court confirmed the constitutional review. republicans, in contrast, never. the republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealt with the divisions of territories. most often there was a proposal tuesday extended west beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this preface, i'm going to get to my main point. when lincoln rejected all compromise with
that we have over the past five years. in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company makes it harder for solar technology generally because the scores from the ranch partners in the field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government puts half a billion into one of its choice? excellent question. i wrote this book because were not just spending half a billion. we are spending $12 billion year-to-date electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that's about six elion and tax breaks and 6 billion in direct expenditures. we are pursuing a vision of green jobs that makes no sense and has low income americans. we brainwash our children to think green is good and think uncritically about green products and green jobs. yet we can't even define what a green job aids. let's start with green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs is calculated, namely energy from renewable sources, energy effici
but in california that is in the tradition and there are others people can build on but if they can look and say okay in order to be really a valuable democratic process something needs to be inclusive and the lubber to it and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say here's how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town halls we can have oranges and others in california so people can take that inspiration and use it wherever they are and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversations. >>> rosemary gibson reports on the creation of the patient protection and affordable care act and its recent passage and fiscal affect on the federal government. this is just over an hour. it's a pleasure to be here. thanks to you at st. peter's university hospital for the opportunity to be here today. the topic today's health care reform. it's based on the book and the principal author called the battle for health care obama as reform for america's future is a nonpartisan analysis of health care reform and we are headed. i appro
the past five years. in contrast in a speech in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company it makes it harder for solar technology generally because the other entrepreneurs in the solar field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government put half a billion dollars into one of its choice. excellent question. i wrote this book because we are not just spending half a billion dollars. we are spending $12 billion a year to make electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that is $6 billion in tax breaks and $6 billion in direct expenditures. the green jobs that makes no sense and has low-income americans, we brainwash our children to think that green is good and fink uncritically about green products and green jobs and yet we can't even define what a green job is. let's start with a green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs that it has counted. namely the energy from renewable sources, e
regulation. >> what impact, if any, do you think that the changes in california and their method for electing congressional representatives will have? >> are you referring to the redistricting? >> yes. democrat versus democrat, republican versus republican in their system of electing. >> if i am understanding your right, you are referring to -- now there was a kind of bipartisan commission that redesigned -- that did the redistricting. now, i actually did a story for the atlantic monthly on redistricting. i had mentioned this thing. there has been -- the belief by many politicians is that there is no such thing as a bipartisan board are nonpartisan board. they often times point to the california commission as a failed experiment because the democrats had menace to influence a series of e-mails obtained by pro public of which suggest that was the minister and floods a lot of these. having said that there are a number of other states in the u.s. that do have bipartisan redistricting commissions. and just for what it's worth another reason why this is a salient topic is that i am often asked, if
. keep them scared, these undocumented people. someone came from california and said, are you going to let him do that? they said, you're from california? this is arizona. he said, i am from arizona. they said, well, it doesn't matter. you can't do it here. he said, actually, he didn't say it, but a woman who said it. it's always a woman who says something and men who take the credit for it. a little woman to the side said, kicked him in the shins say it's not. chavez said that. [laughter] they began to organize. he began to go camp to camp, town to town says you don't recall why you have a great constitution. it was the workers. it was the laborers. it was the mexican-americans who demanded one thing, the recall, the power to recall corrupt official, and we didn't get into the constitution as what hunt put back in the constitution, and it's the one thing you gifted the state to use it. chavez began an amazing recall campaign, but he began a fast for love. i don't need to liberate them, but liberate the hearts of people who hate. i need to liberate the hearts of people who don't rec
, asking to be incorporated into the union. i think the hope was akin to a california had done, establish sovereign state and have u.s. government take it as a done deed and skip territorial status. they send one petitioned asking to be admitted to territory and covered the implications of territorial rule inside a second petition asking for admittance to this day. i was ultimately is wary admitting for a number of reasons, including the small population. so ultimately it ends up in the utah territory. >> next question. over here with the mike, please. thank you. >> i am wondering -- i just finished reading the book this morning. it's brilliant. i wonder if you could tell us a little bit more about the united order and in particular there is some comments at some point in the boat on brigham young's attitude with respect to capitalism. could you expand on that further? >> scheuer. well, he's a little hard to pin down on capitalism mainly because his foremost concern is not allowing outside capitalists to have too much power over developments in utah. he's very much much in favor of promot
of the rocky mountains to california. it did not include california because california was already state. the question was so critical because it had to do with the future slavery and the future of some power in the nation. seveners demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as american citizens to take their property, including smith property coming into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857 in the famous or infamous red scott decision the united states supreme court affirmed this seven constitutional few. republicans, in contrast, said never. no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later that congress can into session and the put forth various compromises proposals. a critical portion of all the with the division of the territories. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line westward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. , after this rather and 90 precious i'm going to get to my main topic, why lincoln rej
as the great plains, the rocky mountains and then west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california because california has you know was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. now, southerners demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857, in the famous or infamous dred scott decision, the united states supreme court affirmed this southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast said never. no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow moral -- no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals, a critical portion of all in some way dealt with the division of the territories. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of a dividing line western beyond the louisiana purchase all
to be in-- incorporated to the union. i think the hope was akin to what california had done, establish a sovereign state and have the u.s. government take it as a done deed and skip territorial status. there's actually there was some confusion. they sent one petition asking to be admitted and got worried and sent a second petition asking for admittance of a state. congress is wary of admitting it for a number of reasons including a small population. ultimately it ends up as a utah territory. >> next question. over here with the mic, please. thank you. >> i'm wondered, you know, i have just finished reading the book this morning. it's brilliant. i wonder if you could tell us a little bit more about the uniterred order, there's some comments about young's attitude with respect to capitalism. could you expand on that further? >> sure. well, he's a little hard to pin down on capitalism mainly because his form of concern is not allowing outside capital to have too much power over developments in utah. he's very -- very much in favorite of promoting that official economic relationships with
incredibly well here. in california, that is not an issue. it is not a tradition there. but if they can look and say, okay, in order to be a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberative and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say, all right, we don't have to have town meetings and all apples. we can have oranges. the people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibilities why is it locally. in some ways, that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> vermont became a state in 1791 and since that time, it has become the largest producer of maple syrup in the united states and one of the blur discredit producers in the country. it is also rich in history and literary culture. over the course of her recent visit with the help of our cable partner, comcast, booktv brings you many interviews with local authors. you can watch a few of those now. >> here we go. i am paul carnahan. this is margarete strawn. we are in the vermont history center. we have a photo albu
with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1994 until 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, he was never even elected vice president. so there you go. jimmy carter, ronald reagan, bill clinton from arkansas and bush from texas. the 2008, it ends with forty-year period. and there were issues that were critical into politics that came out of the sun belt. also, it is on the sun belt and in the south and southwest that we see the lives by the 1970s
aren't we getting together? >> that is a great idea. >> if you change california i could tell you sacramento is broke and. please but against every single tax. [applause] >> this crowd does not need to be reminded. >> the ballot is very long. vote against every single one. it's like giving her a went to a junkie. >> herald-tribune is for sale. how do we by media? >> bella also like to comment on the public-school said. liberals don't favor that but they send their kids to the white private school it does not matter to them but who is by teeing the vouchers to the and mail and al gore was asked in the debate in harlem and he was running for president as he was beholden to the teachers' unions a black reporter said if you are so big on the public schools then why do your kids go to private schools? he got angry and said don't bring my children and to this. way to. [laughter] hold on. not so fast. is great to start another fox news but why is that the only game in town? they have 10 times the ratings of cnn but it has not occurred two msnbc they are getting higher ratings of wonder i
of california in 1962. nixon remembered that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was a fellow named george romney. who's son mitt has been in the news lately. mitt's day complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seemed to think he could run it any way saw he fit. there was talk that ray may have used fannie mae postage or letter head to raise money for the democratic candidates. and the white house was gets complaints from the republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related to foreclosures. all the fees. within nine months nixon fired him as fannie mae without giving any public explanation. he resisted. he full min nate to the press that nixon was turning fannie mae in to a patronage put pudding. he tried to get a restraining order from the federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. ray kept showing up for work anyway. at one point, the lights went out and the phone lines went dead. some people interpreted this as a subtle message f
of california in 1962. nixon still remember that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing sector was a fellow named george romney whose son mitt romney has been in the news lately. his dad complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seem to think he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might use fannie mae postage or letterhead to raise money for democratic candidates. the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related foreclosures, all those fees. well, within nine months of taking office, nixon fired ray lapin as president of fannie mae without giving any public explanation. ray lapin resisted. he fulminated to the press nixon western fannie mae into what he called a patronage putting. try to try to get a restraining order from a federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. but ray kept showing up for work anyway. [laughter] at one point the lights went out at fannie mae's offices
started. and both smith and roosevelt lost the california primary to house speaker john garner and the only reason garner one that is because william randolph hearst the great isolationist had thrown his weight behind barn are's campaign. what that meant his when the democrats made a convention in>÷ chicago, franklin roosevelt was living in as the front runner h- had zero overwhelmingly a large number of votes but in those days the democrats were required a two-thirds margin to be nominated so he was about 100 votes short. there were five or so top leading opponents one of whomñ?? was the governor of maryland who i am not related to and another one was newton baker who was the former secretary of war in the wilson administration and al smith and william mcadoo and several others. if those five had been willing to coalesce behind any, but there is a good chance they could have stopped roosevelt. if al smith had been willing to endorse anybody other than himself, that personally would have gotten the nomination but as they discovered you can't beat somebody with nobody. it wasn
of california and the ninth circuit, and then write out of boston there's the gay and lesbian advocates and defenders and they are bringing what is the most effective case against the so-called defensive marriage act, doma and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or any of those cases and then have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so, is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality and it felt appropriate to write about this and i will tell you a little bit about why intended it for. the book is laid out in the conversation between me and someone who would describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people also tolerance isn't all it's cracked up to be. i have a friend who says that the only thing one should have to tolerate is hemorrhoids. [laughter] perhaps a little overstated. but if you for ever been on the receiving end of tolerance it doesn't feel all that much better than intolerance. if someone is begrudgingly at mending your right to exist it just doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy. so, i imagine a conversations and
in california. that the particular time. there's a whole set of circumstance that lead her to, you know, she's from the tropics, central america, you know, how did she wind up in the desert. everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said, [inaudible] we'll take care of you and give you a place to live shortly there after. i arrive and one of the first things i saw when i rented my shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services 100 miles, the town of 129 presiden. i felt myself to go further out. they are at the edge of beautiful national park. you know that? right. if you haven't been there. u2 album. the joshua tree. you know what it looks like. crazy arms going this way and that. well, i wanted to go further out. there was something that was driving me further out in to the nothing. the big empty, as they say. and also because the further out you went the rent got cheaper and cheaper and cheaper. i was paying $27 5 a month for a two-bed rom house with five acres of land on the edge of 29 palms, right where the sign said next service 100 miles. that's where the b
town meetings and apples. we can of oranges in some other process in california to people can take the inspiration and use it from wherever they are to the democratic possibility rises up locally and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. >> and 73 from the historical society. if a sub for a librarian and were in the vault of history center in vermont. we've got a photo album created by george houghton, a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of burbach troops are in civil war. he presented this album to us in 1863 after he returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters that camp, but also other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that often reproduced as this one of a family of slaves again tieless. right below it is a photograph of soffa vermont officers. >> some of the other pictures showed been batteries they were using that were involved in this. there are photos here show in the aftermath at the burial ground of the soldiers. those photos get used a lot. there's a batter
experiment." he said, "i'm going to call you." and he was on his way to california. so he said, "i'm going to call you from california at your home, and i'm going to tell you that i'm going to come out endorsing ross perot for the presidency." c-span: and he thought that the bush administration was afraid of this? >> guest: yes. yes. actually, both sides might think, "well, what was going on with richard nixon if he's endorsing ross perot?" so he said, "i'm going to tell you that i'm endorsing ross perot. i want you to keep a straight face and a straight voice. don't let on to anything." and he said, "we're going to set this person up if, in fact, there are wiretaps on my phone." so he flew to california, he called me, we went through this little episode, and then nothing ever came of it. so either his phones weren't tapped or nobody thought enough of it to leak it. but it was just one of his little experiments. c-span: hugh sidey came to visit on day, the former time magazine journalist. i -- maybe he's still -- i think he might still write for them sometimes. he had a column on the presi
of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write about this comment and i will talk about who i intended it for. the book is layout, imagined a conversation between me and someone who would probably describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people although tolerances and called it is cracked up to being if you haven't noticed. i have a friend who says the only thing one should have to tolerate as hemorrhoids. perhaps a little overstated, but if you have ever been on the receiving end of tolerance, it doesn't feel all that much better than in tolerance. if someone is begrudgingly admitting your right to exist, it doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy, so i imagi
be curious to know a little bit about her family, in nevada. what did her father do, why move to california? what were his parents like, what were her mother's parents like? >> we're getting into a tricky area. her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had to travel around -- she did a lot of things. he would talk about his good ventures. he had been made minor. term mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child and stayed and eventually married a man named bender. we move to what the code did we decide it was? north dakota and he was killed in a flood up there. actually, i tried hard to find information about the flood that killed him. i called the archives, i spoke to the archivist and could not find a lot of information about her mother's first husband. from that marriage she had two children. than she married will ryan and they moved to nevada, several towns in nevada and he was a minor. she lost one husband to mining and did not want to lose another one. she was constantly putting pressur
. the first amendment applies to public colleges, not private. and the california it permits the standards but private universities are bound. yale and harvard promise freedom of speech to cooling language and those are forcible contracts in massachusetts and in new york. not just legally enforceable but the moral power. from columbia and harvard and yale you do not like being called out for violating their own promises. america has been more shoulder shrugging about it and it is good to step up the argument but you hold them against their own values and people know those are wrong. it is a harder fight. >> i am also said american university and however violated free-speech in the that as of model codes from the first amendment? >> we rate colleges with the system i came up with when it was still a little organization for red light no light or agreed night. these university is really bad the others may say it may not stand up anchor but it is not the worst. is we have 16 green light colleges right now. that is all. that is a little disturbing. but they include dartmouth for example. dartmo
like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and north carolina, i mean, just think about it. this. from 1964 to 2008, it is a period -- a president elected from those years from 1964 to 2008, they were from the sun belt states. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. it ends this forty-year period. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed. it tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense and in opposition to unions and the defense of free enterprise policy. also it is in the sun belt, the south and southwest of the see the sunrise of the 1970s to talk about the religious right. the rise of evangelical and fundamentalist voters. national defense, he was a staunch economist who played an important role in populist politics in the late 50s and early 1960s. one of the things that led this to switch parties in 1964. he was opposing labor unions.
next to the chevy plant in van nuys, california, and we were the loser kids, poor kids who we were supposed to go to vietnam, and if we department get kill, go work in the chevy plant. it was a uaw job, made refrigerators. my father sold them, and they took away the chevy plant, loaded it up on the railroad tracks, took it down to mexico. like they took the plant to china now. they took away our lives. they took away our jobs. i'm not going to let them take away our votes too. i thank you for giving me this opportunity to help us all steal back our votes. thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information, visit the author's webs, gregpalst.com. >> conservative scholar presents thoughts on the obama presidency and what he deems are the, quote, "fatal contradictions, end quote, of liberalism. he speaks to the audience and answers questions for about an hour. >> good evening. i'm matthew spalding, vice president of american studies here at the american foundation. we're in for a treat. here we are, approaching election, pretends ton a water shed recognized by both political par
the public policy first or do you change the law? even new jersey and california have paid maternity leave. they are the only states that do so. a lot of people don't take advantage of it because they are afraid that they won't be considered good workers. so we must get to a place in this country where we value the child and we value the mother and, you know, one consequence of our present lack of these policies is we have, in the united states of america, the highest child poverty rate in developed countries, 20%. what does that have to do with family were policies? welcome to, the best answer is still a paycheck. it is very hard for women to work without a network of support on issues like good and affordable childcare and workplace flexibility and paid family leave. so we must put the policies in place. at the same time, as we change the culture. >> i am trying to decide how deep into scandinavia who want to go. i would prefer sweden to norway. [laughter] i am totally serious. sweden has done something that no other country has done. they have forced paternity leave as well as maternity
by the before columbus foundation and it was held at the university of california berkeley. tomorrow the miami book fair international kicks off in florida and we will take you live there at 6:00 p.m. eastern to hear tom wolfe, author of back to blood. booktv will be live next weekend for more of the festival. those are just a few of the programs we will bring you this weekend. visit booktv.org for complete schedule. >> here's a look at some books being published this week. bill haas surprise when another request president jefferson's political process and thomas jefferson, the art of power. in the patriarch, the remarkable like and turbulent times of joseph kennedy, david nasa chronicles the life and career of the political dynasty. judge andrew napolitano, senior political analyst for fox news argues presidents theodore roosevelt and woodrow wilson disregarded the constitution to promote their own political agendas in theodore and woodrow, how two american presidents destroyed constitutional freedoms. in far from the tree parents, children and the search for identity, national book award win
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now after this rather less than lengthy preface. why lincoln rejected all meaningful comprise which meant the territories. but there must be one thing more. i'm going talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them all of you know know his name abraham lincoln what he was and what he did. the other two not so well known. probably a number of you are familiar with henry clay. the great kentucky statesman. probably few know of william henry in 1860 was a senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency, was by far the most notable and well known republican in the country. finally, here i am. ready to start. >>> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. from the jefferson library in char latesville -- relationship to slavery. he reports that -- ownership and labor of the slaifts but america's third president called silent professionals. and jeffrey jefferson's papers in the research. it's just over an hour. >>> our guest speaker this afternoon is henry w
they do once they're here because i didn't know. my first choice was the vietnamese in california who are there in huge numbers. they've now migrated from los angeles up towards san francisco, just like in miami in a way, there's -- the san jose mercury, a famous old newspaper is, there is now a viet-mercury. unfortunately, i couldn't speak vietnamese, and i couldn't read the paper either. i mean, just not even close. to ours. and then i heard about the following fact about miami: miami seems to be the only city in the whole world in which people from another country with another language and a very different culture took over at the voting machine a big, metropolitan area in just over i would say, slightly over one generation. i'm talking about the cubans. we have a havana-born gentleman here to my right, and so i said i've just got to go, i've got to go see what this is all about. i knew so little -- i still thought that the great industry was tourism in miami. and then i found out that for some time it's been shipping, including shipping that made the miami federal reserve bank hav
really have to do both. because even new jersey and california have paid maternity leave. the only states that do so. but a lot of people don't take advantage because they are afraid. they are afraid they won't be considered good workers. so we have to get to a place in this country where we value the child, where we value the mother. one consequence of our present lack of these policies is we have in the united states of america the highest child poverty rate in developed countries, at 22%. what's that got to do with family work policies? the best answer is still a paycheck. it's very hard for women to work without a network of support on issues like a good affordable childcare, workplace flexibility, and paid family and medical leave. so we have to put policies in place at the same time as we change the culture. >> i'm trying to decide how to deep into standard want to go. i would rather, i would prefer sweden to know what. how about that? i'm totally serious. sweden has done something that no other country has done. they have forced paternity leave as was maternity leave. if i had it m
where stanford california is and i went to berkeley to get away from stanford. i study political theory and then i was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant why was a student, robert, who at that time, he brought in and worked there for a while. i guess the rest is in history but anyway, that's a bit of early backer spent and i want to get in this comment from jill. jill tweets in, what influence do you think mr. hitchens writing had on shaping women's history in america and the world? >> i'm not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously a bloke i have a new. he was absolutely, he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote a piece for "vanity fair," why women aren't funny. at it was one more assignment and he wrote it. and if you actually read it, it doesn't actually, the article doesn't say what the title might imply. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man, and so loved by women. he was very charismatic. women adored him, but he didn't let the sexual card at all. so i don't know what, i don't know if he has a place in quote women's hi
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
communities. in vermont we have town meetings and they work incredibly well here but in california that is not a decision and their decisions people can build on. if they can say okay well, in order to be really a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberate advantage to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework to people to say, look, here is how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town meetings and apples like they do in vermont. we can have oranges are some or some other process so people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibility to rise up locally and hopefully i think in some ways i can have an impact on the national conversation.
bookstores in america like cody's bookstore in berkeley, california, was firebombed. at a bookstore in london that was firebombed toys. bookstores all over the world that were attacked, not just burn but actually people going into bookstores and threatening people working there. and in publishing companies and then, well, the great tragedy was the books, the japanese translator, was murdered at his university in japan. and there was intent to murder and norwegian publisher and the italian translator of the book, for both fortunately survived. but this was a shooting war. and the point is that in all these cases, the evidence that emerged showed that these were professional hits. >> this was not spontaneous. >> no, no. these were professional hits. and so basically the danger was very high. until this moment in around the turn-of-the-century, when we finally managed to get the iranians to back down. and at the point at which we are convinced certain that the action had stood down these gangs of killers, really most of the danger went away. >> dr. hatchett and to this next question. what is the
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
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